Young kristoff coloring pages

Published at Wednesday, 25 March 2020.

The lite version of Galkyd is simply thinner. I use it more than the other. I love it. Paintings I did 16 years ago using Galkyds look as pristine as the day I painted them. You'll also need a canvas and some paint. I buy a tube of red, green, blue, purple, yellow, brown, white and black. I prefer what's called Ivory Black and a soft mixing white as you'll add white to a lot of different colors to make lighter versions. From these basic colors you can make any exotic color by mixing them in combination's. Be creative and experiment. And don't be afraid of color, because color is the most popular in museums! The bright paintings are historically the crowd favorites. As for color variety from these basic colors, mix red and white to make pink, mix yellow with green to make lime green, white with blue to make light blue, white with black to make gray, etc. Use your common sense and play with it! You'll also need pencils, an eraser and some Turpentine or Turpentine substitute. Keep your brushes soaking in it in a plastic cup to keep them clean and ready for your next color choice.... and to keep them from drying out. Cheaper then doing it yourself. Some would argue that if you're going to all the trouble to fully prep the car yourself, then why not just shoot the paint as well? Why get a shop involved? The answer is simply that you'll get a better job and for less money. Some would argue with this, but the fact is that if you've never sprayed a car before then your first car will have a steep, and expensive learning curve. Laying down an even, consistent coat of paint takes considerable practice. Also, paint and equipment is not cheap. You'll need to buy primer, color coat, clear coat, reducers & catalysts. None of these are inexpensive and you can easily spend as much in paint materials alone as the cheapest paint job at Maaco or similar shop. Definitely good inside the house is a new vinyl primer-sealer to be used as a base coat under any paint. It dries in as little as 30 minutes.

Step three: go online and study the basics of shadow and light. It's a visual thing, and too complicated to talk about here. But once you see it, it'll come to you quickly. Simply Google "shadow and light in painting" and the basics will come up. Once you know these rules, you can apply it to any shape, any form, any painting. And it'll make you keenly aware of shadow and light on virtually any object on earth. It's what makes a painting three- dimensional and expensive looking. You can also buy art books on shadow and light at any bookstore. But make sure you sit down for a couple of hours and study it. It will come quickly to you, I promise. Take your time there is no rush. There is nothing wrong with having your project take a couple of weeks. We've devised a simple, full proof way to determine whether you are Light or Deep. Look at your overall complexion, eye and hair color. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the lightest and 10 being the deepest, determine where you fit. So, a 1 would be the palest Nordic complexion with light blond hair. A 10 would be the deepest ebony skin tone and dark or black hair. So, for example: most Mediterranean and Middle Easterners have dark eyes and deep skin and are, therefore, Deep. Most Northern Europeans have blonde hair and light eyes and are Light. Where do you fall? Give yourself a number. If you fall anywhere from 1 to 4 then you are a Light. If you are 5 or greater you are on the Deep side. Can you get a good paint job from a low buck paint shop? Yes! Professional paint pros and high dollar restorers may scoff, but it's very possible to get a good looking, long lasting paint job from a discount paint shop like Earl Scheib or Maaco. It's not appropriate for every car. I wouldn't hand them the keys to my Shelby GT500 or '53 Corvette, but for those on a budget it's a very good option. The key to a successful budget paint job is to prep the car yourself. Leave nothing to the shop except actually laying down the paint. (note: For purposes of discussion we'll use a classic Mustang as the example, but this process holds true to really any older car)