Ut coloring pages

Published at Tuesday, 7 April 2020.

Preparation, the key to a successful paint job is to take the correct steps when preparing the job. Preparation for this article, has two parts, the first part is wall prep. The walls you are going to paint may have nail holes or imperfections that need to be filled before you paint. The proper way to fill them, if they are smaller is with water putty, by simply forcing a little bit of the putty in the hole and breaking it off flush with the surface. For larger depressions, use a drywall compound or spackle, which may require a second application to fully fill the indentation and make the repair/"patch" flush with the wall. Amateur house painters never had as much help as today. Scores of new paints and equipment placed on the market in the last few years make it possible for the weekend handyman to paint his own house almost as easily as a professional. From one-coat paints to disposable blowtorches, everything has been designed to make the job go faster, look better and cost less. You'll need a large compressor, not just the typical 20 gallon variety most of us have. This is a 60 gallon, vertical compressor with typically a 5+ hp motor. Then you'll need a decent paint gun (possibly 2; one for primer and one for color) which again is an expense. Then there's the question of where you'll paint the car. Renting a paint booth is best, but can be expensive and hard to find. You can always seal up your garage or shoot out in the wetted down driveway, but you'll inevitably get dirt and moisture into the paint.

Choose from historical hues for period homes; sleek chalky finishes that stand up to the rigours of modern life; or new formulas designed to suit all surfaces. By understanding the product you can unleash all the design possibilities of paint that make it such a tempting medium. Materials and their application, every paint manufacturers paint will vary. If you are freshening up old walls and painting back to the existing color, the product doesn't have to be high end or have good coverage. If you need to paint a dark color over light color or light color over dark, you may want to consider purchasing a top quality paint to avoid multiple coats. I suggest Valspar, Pittsburgh or Benjamin Moore top of the line wall paint. These brands work well for straight out of the bucket use and are application friendly. Sherwin Williams is not my first choice because the coverage is poor and you will have to apply multiple coats but, it does apply, fluently. If you find a product does not apply well, maybe it is to heavy and/or sagging on the wall, you may need to thin the paint with a little water, this will reduce the coverage but make the paint flow better and lay down nicer on the surface. I do recommend latex paints for all applications, these days a good high end latex is as good as oil paint and your tools clean up much easier, it will also be less harsh on the respiratory system. The only situation I recommend oil paint, is as a primer/stain blocker over stains that "bleed" through the paint. You can get a stain blocking oil primer in a convenient spray can and spot prime any trouble areas before painting and in the case you need to prime all of the wall due to smoke or water damage, I recommend getting it in gallons and rolling it on where the stains are present. Don't forget proper ventilation and/or a respirator when using the oil based primers! By far, the most important characteristic in determining whether you are Warm or Cool is your hair color. If you can't determine your exact eye or skin tone, then your hair color will provide the answer. Why? It frames your face! The purpose of this article is to take the mystery out of the process of painting. This article is only written to get you started. I'll write more detailed techniques later. But this article will set you on your way to experimenting and having fun with paint. Ultimately it's like anything in this world. Before you have the knowledge, it's complicated. But once you have it, it's easy! Knowledge is power, and this phenomenon definitely applies to painting. The technical aspects are the easy part. Anyone can do it. You ultimately could be as capable as Monet with practice. We humans can do whatever we decide to do! Deciding WHAT to paint is the hard part. It takes discipline and a singularly focused desire to create one painting after another. For whatever reason, I loved it the minute I started. And I never looked back. I love it today as much as I did over 16 years ago. I never have "writer's block" either as to what to paint. I just paint from my experiences in life. So don't think too hard on it. Paint that apple sitting on the table, or paint the tree in your own back yard, paint your girlfriend in an unusual way. But paint something that means something to you, that's all that matters. Make it funky, make it interesting. If it's abstract, remember that abstract art has long been the most desirable. It's an expression of the individual, make it unique. For those who want realism, take a picture. What's amazing is that once you do it, you realize it's the ultimate escape into happiness. Suddenly you forget your problems for that period of time. You have control, and no one can take it away from you once you are skilled at painting. The process is addicting. But like anything, you must START! And once you do, look out....you'll be hooked.