Lois ehlert coloring pages

Published at Thursday, 19 March 2020.

A good interior paint job is often 50% preparation and 50% painting. Do not rush in preparing the surfaces in your eagerness to get at the brush or roller. If you do not prepare the surfaces properly, you'll be back with the paint brush or roller in a few months. Also, when checking the paint, be realistic and don't ignore areas just for the sake of convenience. It will cost you more in time and money later. Typically if one area of the paint is cracked or peeling, then the paint on the entire car is suspect. Maybe the rest of the car just hasn't quite reached that point of decay, but it will shortly. So if you only fix areas that look bad, you'll likely find that you wasted a paint job when the other areas start to crack or peel in a year or two. Materials and their application, every paint manufacturers paint will vary. If you are freshening up old walls and painting back to the existing color, the product doesn't have to be high end or have good coverage. If you need to paint a dark color over light color or light color over dark, you may want to consider purchasing a top quality paint to avoid multiple coats. I suggest Valspar, Pittsburgh or Benjamin Moore top of the line wall paint. These brands work well for straight out of the bucket use and are application friendly. Sherwin Williams is not my first choice because the coverage is poor and you will have to apply multiple coats but, it does apply, fluently. If you find a product does not apply well, maybe it is to heavy and/or sagging on the wall, you may need to thin the paint with a little water, this will reduce the coverage but make the paint flow better and lay down nicer on the surface. I do recommend latex paints for all applications, these days a good high end latex is as good as oil paint and your tools clean up much easier, it will also be less harsh on the respiratory system. The only situation I recommend oil paint, is as a primer/stain blocker over stains that "bleed" through the paint. You can get a stain blocking oil primer in a convenient spray can and spot prime any trouble areas before painting and in the case you need to prime all of the wall due to smoke or water damage, I recommend getting it in gallons and rolling it on where the stains are present. Don't forget proper ventilation and/or a respirator when using the oil based primers!

Knock down texture is basically a orange peel that is sprayed on and allowed to "set-up" for a minute or two then gently "knocked down" by running a 6" drywall knife over it, "knocking down" the surface of the texture. Although knock down is a flattened version of orange peel, I suggest you do not use a spray can of orange peel, the knock down comes in its own spray can and the results are much better, again experiment before spraying it on the wall. However, If ever you apply any of the textures to the wall and are not satisfied with the results, wash the texture off immediately before it dries, then allow the wall to dry and try it again. Once you have the texture applied to your liking and you have allowed it to dry, you may want to paint the patches a couple of time before painting the entire wall, especially for walls where the paint to be applied will have some sheen. Multiple coats on these areas will make them blend in, unnoticeable, with the rest of the wall. You will know if the patches need more coats of paint, because the patch/texture will have absorbed the paint causing the spot to look duller than the rest of the existing wall. For stippling you need a special brush; get one that is flat, and has short, stiff bristles. Another idea keeping Paint Brush moist until the next paint coat is applied (but not leaving for extended periods) is leaving Brush in container, wrapping top with plastic, sticking handle out the top, and taping around the can. This resembles the Maxwell House Coffee Container mentioned earlier. If plastic and masking tape is still not available, and time between coats is not very long, take that sopping wet rag, draping over the top of paint bucket with Paint Brush still in it. This technique works best when using Latex waterborne paints. CLEAN-UP and STORAGE or DISPOSAL TIPS. · If there are paint drops on your floor, don't let it stay there. As the paint sets longer, the harder it will be cleared. Use a cloth with soap and water or a solvent for cleaning. · Use a razor-blade scraper or a putty knife to chip off bigger paint droplets that have dried. · Use a scraper to trim around windowpanes. · Wash and dry paintbrushes and rollers. Store them according to the brand's recommendation not all paintbrushes have the same type of bristles nor the rollers have the same material. · Clean the paint from the rim of the can. Tap container lids tight with a hammer and block of wood. · Store solvent-based paint cans upside down to prevent a skin from forming. · Store your paints in normal or room temperature. Never put the paints in extreme hot or cold rooms. · Each states in the U.S. or every community/ county differs on paint can disposal methods. Check your local environmental, health, and safety laws.